South Side Chicago
In the 1970s on Chicago’s South Side, revelers in their finest packed into nightclubs, dancing the night away to the soulful music of the era while knocking back a drink or three at now-extinct blues clubs like Perv’s House, Pepper’s Hideout and the High Chaparral.
Michael L. Abramson South Side Chicago
In the 1970s on Chicago’s South Side, revelers in their finest packed into nightclubs, dancing the night away to the soulful music of the era while knocking back a drink or three at now-extinct blues clubs like Perv’s House, Pepper’s Hideout and the High Chaparral.
Michael L. Abramson South Side Chicago
In the 1970s on Chicago’s South Side, revelers in their finest packed into nightclubs, dancing the night away to the soulful music of the era while knocking back a drink or three at now-extinct blues clubs like Perv’s House, Pepper’s Hideout and the High Chaparral.
Michael L. Abramson South Side Chicago
In the 1970s on Chicago’s South Side, revelers in their finest packed into nightclubs, dancing the night away to the soulful music of the era while knocking back a drink or three at now-extinct blues clubs like Perv’s House, Pepper’s Hideout and the High Chaparral.
Michael L. Abramson

South Side Chicago

In the 1970s on Chicago’s South Side, revelers in their finest packed into nightclubs, dancing the night away to the soulful music of the era while knocking back a drink or three at now-extinct blues clubs like Perv’s House, Pepper’s Hideout and the High Chaparral.

Michael L. Abramson

Sport Shirt Bill

Bill Veeck was baseball franchise owner and promoter. Veeck was at various times the owner of the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns and Chicago White Sox. As owner and team president of the Indians in 1947, Veeck signed Larry Doby and thus successfully integrated the American League. He also came up with the idea of planting ivy on the walls of Wrigley Field.

Veeck served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II where he lost his right leg. He had a series of wooden legs and, as an inveterate smoker, cut holes in them to use as an ashtray.

Adrian Tomine’s New York Drawings

Artist, illustrator and frequent New Yorker contributor Adrian Tomine just released a compilation of his comics, illustrations and sketches that highlight both the sense of loneliness/non-loneliness that comes with life in New York City.

More here.

Christy Mathewson

Long time right handed pitcher for the New York Giants.

Grover Cleveland Alexander “Old Pete”

Grover Cleveland Alexander wasn’t drunk out there on the mound, the way people thought. He was an epileptic. Old Pete would fall down with a seizure between innings, then go back and pitch another shutout." -Ty Cobb

Alexander spent most of the 1918 season in France as a sergeant with the 342nd Field Artillery. While he was serving in France, he was exposed to German mustard gas and a shell exploded near him, causing partial hearing loss and triggering the onset of epilepsy. Following his return from the war, Alexander suffered from shell shock and was plagued with epileptic seizures. In spite of all this, Alexander gave Chicago several successful years and won another pitching triple crown in 1920. 

Bulldog

Baseball players are smarter than football players. How often do you see a baseball team penalized for too many men on the field?" Jim Bouton

Vamos a la Playa
More here. Vamos a la Playa
More here.

Vamos a la Playa

More here.

Adam Bartos
"I took these photographs after moving to Los Angeles from New York City late in 1978."
"I was lost, and I spent a lot of time driving around and getting to know the city. Not unusually, I had a romance going with LA from film, photography, and television, and the place felt, as it still does to me, unreal in a familiar way. My photographs were attempts to locate myself in the actual time and place, by looking at what was typical but might, or might not, reference the mythic LA in the most oblique manner possible." 
More here. Adam Bartos
"I took these photographs after moving to Los Angeles from New York City late in 1978."
"I was lost, and I spent a lot of time driving around and getting to know the city. Not unusually, I had a romance going with LA from film, photography, and television, and the place felt, as it still does to me, unreal in a familiar way. My photographs were attempts to locate myself in the actual time and place, by looking at what was typical but might, or might not, reference the mythic LA in the most oblique manner possible." 
More here. Adam Bartos
"I took these photographs after moving to Los Angeles from New York City late in 1978."
"I was lost, and I spent a lot of time driving around and getting to know the city. Not unusually, I had a romance going with LA from film, photography, and television, and the place felt, as it still does to me, unreal in a familiar way. My photographs were attempts to locate myself in the actual time and place, by looking at what was typical but might, or might not, reference the mythic LA in the most oblique manner possible." 
More here. Adam Bartos
"I took these photographs after moving to Los Angeles from New York City late in 1978."
"I was lost, and I spent a lot of time driving around and getting to know the city. Not unusually, I had a romance going with LA from film, photography, and television, and the place felt, as it still does to me, unreal in a familiar way. My photographs were attempts to locate myself in the actual time and place, by looking at what was typical but might, or might not, reference the mythic LA in the most oblique manner possible." 
More here.

Adam Bartos

"I took these photographs after moving to Los Angeles from New York City late in 1978."

"I was lost, and I spent a lot of time driving around and getting to know the city. Not unusually, I had a romance going with LA from film, photography, and television, and the place felt, as it still does to me, unreal in a familiar way. My photographs were attempts to locate myself in the actual time and place, by looking at what was typical but might, or might not, reference the mythic LA in the most oblique manner possible." 

More here.

Adam Dock
A’DAM DOC’k’ was a series made by Raimond Wouda and Henk Wildschut and gives both a distant and intimate view on the port of Amsterdam. Wildschut made intimate portraits of the workers during their moments of rest or while they were in the lockerrooms. Wouda photographed three prominent companies seated in the harbour and a topographical view from the harbour itself while he was standing on a large boat which was entering the harbour through the Northsea-Canal from the sea and three prominent compagnies seated in the harbour. Adam Dock
A’DAM DOC’k’ was a series made by Raimond Wouda and Henk Wildschut and gives both a distant and intimate view on the port of Amsterdam. Wildschut made intimate portraits of the workers during their moments of rest or while they were in the lockerrooms. Wouda photographed three prominent companies seated in the harbour and a topographical view from the harbour itself while he was standing on a large boat which was entering the harbour through the Northsea-Canal from the sea and three prominent compagnies seated in the harbour. Adam Dock
A’DAM DOC’k’ was a series made by Raimond Wouda and Henk Wildschut and gives both a distant and intimate view on the port of Amsterdam. Wildschut made intimate portraits of the workers during their moments of rest or while they were in the lockerrooms. Wouda photographed three prominent companies seated in the harbour and a topographical view from the harbour itself while he was standing on a large boat which was entering the harbour through the Northsea-Canal from the sea and three prominent compagnies seated in the harbour.

Adam Dock

A’DAM DOC’k’ was a series made by Raimond Wouda and Henk Wildschut and gives both a distant and intimate view on the port of Amsterdam. Wildschut made intimate portraits of the workers during their moments of rest or while they were in the lockerrooms. Wouda photographed three prominent companies seated in the harbour and a topographical view from the harbour itself while he was standing on a large boat which was entering the harbour through the Northsea-Canal from the sea and three prominent compagnies seated in the harbour.

The Last Road North
A visual history of the people and landscape of Alaska’s Dalton Highway by Ben Huff. The Last Road North
A visual history of the people and landscape of Alaska’s Dalton Highway by Ben Huff. The Last Road North
A visual history of the people and landscape of Alaska’s Dalton Highway by Ben Huff. The Last Road North
A visual history of the people and landscape of Alaska’s Dalton Highway by Ben Huff.

The Last Road North

A visual history of the people and landscape of Alaska’s Dalton Highway by Ben Huff.

Dune Life

Joel Wynn Rees & James Whineray.

Mordecai Three Finger Brown

Indiana-born Mordecai Peter Centennial Brown was one of the top pitchers of the Dead Ball Era.

A farming accident during his youth caused him to lose most of the index finger on his right hand, and a fall shortly after left most of the other fingers misshapen. In a classic case of turning lemons into lemonade, Brown used his handicap to grip the baseball in a way which caused his curve ball to break sharply down before reaching the plate, making it extremely difficult for hitters to get under it.

Headline writers, with the usual subtlety of the times, predictably (though inaccurately) named him “Three Finger” Brown.